Project Contributors

Richard Salomon

Richard Salomon is a Professor in the Department of Asian Languages and Literature at the University of Washington. He received a B.A. in Oriental Studies from Columbia University (1970) and a Ph.D. in Sanskrit from the University of Pennsylvania (1975). He specializes in the study of Sanskrit and Prakrit inscriptions and Gāndhārī manuscripts, and has published numerous articles on these and related subjects. He serves as co‐director of the Early Buddhist Manuscripts Project.

His publications include:




Collett Cox

Collett Cox is a Professor in the Department of Asian Languages and Literature at University of Washington. She received a B.A. in Religion from Carleton College and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Religion from Columbia University (1976, 1983). From 1978 to 1982, she pursued dissertation research in Japan on the Sarvāstivāda abhidharma and specifically Saṅghabhadra’s Nyāyānusāra. From 1983 to 1985, she served as Visiting Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor in the Department of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. At the University of Washington, she has been honored with a Liberal Arts Professorship and an Arts and Humanities Research Professorship. Her primary research interests are Indian Buddhist doctrine and text history, and she specializes in the abhidharma of the Sarvāstivāda school. She serves as co‐director of the Early Buddhist Manuscripts Project.

Her publications include:




Mark Allon

Mark Allon is a Lecturer in South Asian Buddhist Studies in the Department of Indian Sub‐Continental Studies at the University of Sydney. He received a Diploma of Arts from the City Art Institute Sydney (1981), a B.A. (with honors) in Asian Studies from the Australian National University (1981) and a Ph.D. in Buddhist Studies from the University of Cambridge (1995). He taught courses and worked as a Research Assistant at the School of Oriental and African Studies and at King’s College London. In 1996, he was a Bukkyō Dendō Kyōkai Research Fellow at Kyōto University. From 1997 to 2001, he was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Washington, and from 2002 to 2007, he was an Australian Research Council Fellow at the University of Sydney. His main research interests are the formation, composition, and transmission of early Buddhist literature.

His publications include:




Timothy Lenz

Timothy Lenz is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Asian Languages and Literature at the University of Washington. He received a B.A. in Music and Religion from Western Michigan University (1979), pursued Asian Studies at the University of Michigan (1980–1987) and received an M.A. and Ph.D. in Asian Languages and Literature from the University of Washington (1994, 1999). His main research interests are Sanskrit and Prakrit language, literature and philology. His M.A. thesis is A Study of the Rāula‐Vela Inscription from Dhār, Madhya Pradesh: Text, Translation, Phonology, Morphology, & an Examination of its Place among other Literary Inscriptions and his Ph.D. dissertation is A New Version of the Gāndhārī Dharmapada: British Library Kharoṣṭhī Fragments 16 + 25.

His publications include:




Jason Neelis

Jason Neelis is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religion and Culture at Wilfrid Laurier University. He received a B.A. in Classics and South Asian Studies from Brown University (1990), an M.A. in Asian Studies from the University of Texas (1992) and a Ph.D. in Asian Languages and Literature from the University of Washington (2001). His main research interests are the early transmission of Buddhism throughout and beyond South Asia, Kharoṣṭhī and Brāhmī inscriptions in the Northern Areas of Pakistan and Buddhist manuscripts in Gāndhārī and Sanskrit. His Ph.D. dissertation is Long-Distance Trade and the Transmission of Buddhism through Northern Pakistan, Primarily Based on Kharoṣṭhī and Brāhmī Inscriptions.




Andrew Glass

Andrew Glass works for Microsoft Corporation. He received a B.A. (with honors) in Sanskrit and Religious Studies from the University of London (1996) and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Asian Languages and Literature from the University of Washington (2006). From 2003 to 2004 he was a Bukkyō Dendō Kyōkai Research Fellow at Bukkyō University, and from 2007 to 2008 he was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Washington. His M.A. thesis (A Preliminary Study of Kharoṣṭhī Manuscript Paleography) re‐examines the development of the Kharoṣṭhī script from the point of view of the new manuscript discoveries. His Ph.D. dissertation (Connected Discourses in Gandhāra), is a study, edition, and translation of four Gāndhārī sūtras on meditation from a Saṃyuktāgama collection. He is co‐editor of the Dictionary of Gāndhārī.

His publications include:




Stefan Baums

Stefan Baums teaches Sanskrit, Prakrit and Pali language and literature and South Asian Buddhism at the Institute for Indian and Tibetan Studies of the University of Munich and serves as lead researcher of the Buddhist Manuscripts from Gandhāra project at the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Before joining the University of Munich, he held research and teaching posts at the University of Copenhagen, the University of Washington, the University of California, Berkeley, and Leiden University, and was a Visiting Professor of South Asian and Buddhist Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include Buddhist philology and epigraphy, the beginnings of written Buddhist literature, the interaction of written and oral modes of text transmission, the development of Buddhist hermeneutics, and the description of Gāndhārī language and literature. His current work focuses on the decipherment and edition of three Gāndhārī birch‐bark manuscripts containing commentaries on early Buddhist verses, and on a comprehensive study of the historical connections and exegetical principles of this group of verse commentaries and the related Gāndhārī Saṃgītisūtra commentary. He is co‐editor (with Andrew Glass) of the Dictionary of Gāndhārī, and director (with David Mellins) of the Buddhist Translators’ Workbench project at the Mangalam Research Center for Buddhist Languages.




Mei‐huang Lee

Mei‐huang Lee (Shih Tien‐chang) received degrees from National Taiwan University and from the Chung‐Hwa Institute of Buddhist Studies (1990) and a Ph.D. in Asian Languages and Literature from the University of Washington (2009). Her theses were a textual study of the Six Perfections (六度集研究 Liùdù jí yánjiù), and an examination of the meaning of the term vipassanā. Her Ph.D. dissertation is A Study of the Gāndhārī Dārukkhandhopamasutta (“Discourse on the Simile of the Log”).